Sixth Form Academic

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A Levels enable you to specialise in subjects you love, with a view to a future career. You learn to manage time and make the most of private study and enrichment opportunities. 61% of our students achieved A*/A in 2022 and students are pursuing study paths as diverse as Medicine, Engineering, Classics and Dance at university.

Every Head of Department is an experienced A Level teacher able to give you expert guidance. Average A Level class size is just 5 students, and tutorial-style teaching helps ensure you achieve your potential.

Courses

  • Art and Design

    The opportunity to build on the solid foundation of GCSE Art is one that many students take. The A-level course is a natural follow on encouraging observational skills, experimentation with materials and imagination, analysis of the visual world and discovering ways to reflect and interpret ideas. Through exploration of practical techniques such as printing, mixed-media, painting and three-dimensional materials, students can develop their confidence and understanding of all things visual. Drawing, as in the GCSE, is the backbone of the course and pupils learn to use it as the means to begin their personalised research.

    We are delighted to have a dedicated gallery space so all Sixth Form students are given the space to exhibit their work, thus extending their experience as practising artists. Practical exploration of art history and contemporary artists through studies and sketchbook work are begun from a wide range of visits to exhibitions and galleries. Students are encouraged to explore their ideas in depth and through their practical skills, develop independent research.

    All Sixth Formers have access to a dedicated specialist work space in the Sixth Form studio so that they can be supported in working outside of lesson time. Themes of study are wide ranging but often include aspects of the natural world, artists and architects the human form and the built environment. The School’s unique location in the centre of Brighton allows students to study the urban and the natural environment. This makes for really exciting outcomes and many of our girls are inspired to study Art at degree level.

    Course structure:
    Exam board: OCR Unit 1: Personal Investigation (60%)
    This unit is divided into the practical and academic section. Emphasis is on practical coursework developing ideas, refining them in sketchbooks as well as some final resolved pieces. Academic research allows students to study in depth aspects of the visual arts that particularly interest them. This personal study will take the form of a visual workbook with an accompanying 3000-word essay.

    Unit 2: Controlled Assignment (40%)
    From a series of thematic titles given by OCR, the candidate chooses one question which needs to be researched by direct observation and artists research. Over a preparatory period of 8 weeks, students develop ideas in a supporting sketchbook and prep. Sheets to present alongside their final piece. (15 hour examination).

    Beyond A Level
    Students will develop sufficient skill for the study of Art to be rewarding in its own right, but it also provides an essential foundation for a wide range of careers in Art, Design and Architecture. Art is accepted for entry into Arts and Humanities courses at universities and as a supporting A-level in many other subject areas.

    Careers include: Theatre Design, Fashion Design, Graphics, Architecture, Computer Game Design, Art History, Museum and Gallery work, Film and Television to name but a few!

    Entry Requirements:
    Grade 6 in GCSE Art. Alternatively, an art portfolio submission will be considered where students have not studied Art at GCSE.

  • Biology

    If you want to understand how complex organisms actually are, then this is the subject for you. Biology is never far from the news, with COVID meaning this is truer than ever. You may also have seen the discussion over Geronimo the alpaca and the bovine tb argument, badger culls, or how parents are trying to fly their ill child across the world for life-saving treatment but doctors worry the flight will harm them; or how boys are now to be given the HPV vaccine. All of these news articles can be linked to the Biology course. You will cover topics involving the small microorganisms to topics of large populations. You will understand the workings of a cell and then learn about the smaller parts, for example how new DNA technology could help eliminate disease and stop tumours growing using the relatively new idea of epigenetics.

    The course also covers the current issues of how climate change is affecting our environment and what this may mean in the future. This range of topics ensures there is something that every student knows they will love, and many other topics they will realise they find fascinating. Biology A-level is challenging but also rewarding and you will be amazed at the progress you will make across the two-year course.

    Course Structure
    Exam Board: AQA

    It is a linear two-year course and comprises of three exams at the end. The first is based on the year 12 content and finishes with three 5-mark questions. The second is based on year 13 content and finished with a 15-mark comprehension. The third exam is a synoptic paper that covers both years and finishes with a 25-mark essay (which you will be fully prepared for – these are nothing like English or history essays).

    You will also be required to complete 12 required practicals. You will be given a lab book to use and complete throughout the course. After each practical your lab book will be marked and skills ticked off. At the end of the course, if you pass your practical skills you will be awarded a P after your grade. E.g. A P.

    Beyond A Level
    An A-level in Biology will show any university or future employer that you have a good set of transferable skills including statistical, evaluative, comprehensive, practical and teamwork skills. These are desirable even if you do not choose to go on and study Biology at a higher level.

    Biology is an essential component for any degree involving the biological sciences. Chemistry would also have to be taken if a medical or healthcare related degree was being considered. There have been students who take Biology with the intention of not studying this at a higher level, who have gone on to study a range of subject from Law, English, History, Maths, and Physiotherapy degrees.

    Entry Requirements
    Grade 7 in GCSE Maths and grade 7 in GCSE Biology or Double Science.

  • Chemistry

    Chemistry A-level delves more deeply into topics with which you are already familiar, such as bonding, and those with which you may not be, such as entropy. Chemistry requires an understanding and application of knowledge, making it completely different to the demands of GCSE. As an experimental science lessons in our Sixth Form will reinforce what you learn; we do far more experimental work than the core/required practical work required by the course. You will benefit hugely from working in smaller teaching groups because it allows dedicated one-to-one support; you will not simply be ‘a face in the crowd’ struggling to get help.

    A weekly, exclusively A-level, clinic is a central part of our teaching and learning in addition to being able to come and see your teachers at any time for additional help. You will develop excellent learning independence, an essential skill for university and beyond, whilst still enjoying and benefiting from the structure and support we provide.

    Course Structure
    Exam board: Edexcel

    There are three examination papers that are taken at the end of the course and no assessed coursework. There are 16 core (required) experiments that are compulsory (although, of course, we do more than that).
    Three examination papers, taken at the end of the course:
    C1 1h 45 min: physical chemistry and inorganic chemistry (30%)
    C2 1h 45 min: organic chemistry and physical chemistry (30%)
    C3 2h 30 min: the entire course, including the practical skills gained from the core (required) practical exercises (40%).

    Beyond A-level
    Chemistry is essential for a wide variety of careers, such as medicine, pharmacy, dentistry, veterinary science and biochemistry. You could even become a chemistry teacher. Given the problem solving, analytical and research skills that the course will help you to develop, along with teamwork and communication, it provides an excellent route into non-scientific subjects, such as law and journalism.

    Entry Requirements
    Grade 7 in GCSE Maths and at least grade 7 in GCSE Chemistry or Double Science.

  • Classical Civilisation

    The Classical Civilisation course offers the opportunity to explore the significance of Greek and Roman culture in our contemporary lives. The course enables students both to gain a broad understanding of the major periods of classical civilisation and to study selected topics at greater depth through the reading of Greek and Roman authors in translation.

    In the A-level, we study three key areas of the ancient world. Firstly, we explore the concepts of epic poetry and read both Homer’s Iliad and Virgil’s Aeneid in translation. Heroism, human emotion and the demands of society are all explored through the study of these poems. In addition, we look at Roman politics and the republican era of Roman history, which enables us to look at political conflict and disorder in ways that are very relevant today. Finally, we study art history and look at the development of vase painting, freestanding sculpture and architectural sculpture from archaic through to high classical Greece. In this module we explore how art can be used as political propaganda and can be reflective of the political situation of the era.

    If you enjoy learning about ancient culture and society without translating the original languages, then Classical Civilisation is the subject for you. You will find the course challenging, enjoyable and stimulating and you will be encouraged to relate what you study to the modern world and your own experience. English, History, Modern Languages, Religious Studies, Drama, Geography and Art all complement Classical Civilisation.

    Course Structure
    Exam Board: OCR- H408

    The World of the Hero: 40% of total A-level Culture and the Arts: Greek Art: 30% of total A-level Beliefs and Ideas: Politics of the late Republic: 30% of total A-level.

    Beyond A-level
    Students of Classical Civilisation go on to follow a wide variety of degree courses including Archaeology, Ancient History, English, History and Sociology. Career opportunities include jobs in specialist areas such as an archaeologist, museum curator or archivist, the heritage industry, journalism, law, media and politics.

    Entry Requirements
    Grade 6 in GCSE English literature or language; or Classical Civilisations GCSE. GCSE Classical Civilisation is NOT a requirement for the A-level.

  • Computer Science

    Computer Science is a practical subject where students can apply the academic principles learned in the classroom to real-world systems. It’s an intensely creative subject that combines invention, problem-solving and excitement.

    This subject really gives the students the opportunity to shape their world and the world of others through the creation of digital hardware and software.
    The aims of this qualification are to enable learners to develop an understanding and ability to apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, decomposition, logic, algorithms and data representation.

    Students will also build the ability to analyse problems in computational terms through practical experience of solving such problems, including writing programs to do so.
    They will develop the capacity to think creatively, innovatively, analytically, logically and critically. In addition to this they’ll begin to see relationships between different aspects of computer science and further enhance their mathematical skills.

    Course Structure
    Exam Board: OCR

    There are 2 OCR Exam papers in the final year and a coursework project which will also be submitted in the final year. 01 – Computer systems, 140 marks, 2 hours and 30 minutes written paper (no calculators allowed). 40% of total A-level 02 – Algorithms and programming, 140 marks, 2 hours and 30 minutes written paper (no calculators allowed). 40% of total A-level 03 – Programming project, 70 marks. Non-exam assessment. 20% of total A-level.

    Beyond A-level
    Students who have studied Computer Science at A-level have gone on to work in areas such as:
    Medicine
    Research and Development
    Entertainment
    Web development
    Cyber security
    Information systems manager
    Database administrator
    Systems analyst
    Games developer
    Software Developer
    Artificial intelligence
    Hardware Development
    Medicine
    Research and Development
    Entertainment

    The course imbues students with resilience and problems-solving skills that will benefit them in any future projects.

    Entry Requirements
    Grade 6 in Computer Science at GCSE. Alternatively, if Computer Science has not been studied at KS4, a grade 6 at GCSE in Maths.

  • Dance

    A-level Dance is a hugely rewarding course that offers a dynamic mix of physical and mental challenge for those who are passionate about Dance. During the two-year course, you will have the opportunity to develop your own artistic practice, while also strengthening your technical skills. Performance opportunities will enable you to translate theory to real life, helping you to develop confidence and a real sense of presence in front of others.

    Through looking at professional dance works, you will grow your understanding of the UK and international dance landscape as well as the social, political, historical and economic factors that have influenced Dance today. This course is rich in opportunities for you to challenge and apply your interpretative, analytical and evaluative skills. The benefits of these critical thinking skills extend far beyond A-level Dance; they will help to feed your future curiosity, appreciation and understanding in all areas of life.

    Course Structure
    Exam Board: AQA

    Component 1 (50% of A-level) – Performance and Choreography – Practical exam
    • Solo performance (25% weighting of Component 1)
    • Performance in a quartet (25% weighting of Component 1)
    • Your group choreography (50% weighting of Component 1)
    Component 2 (50% of A-level) – Critical engagement – Written exam
    • Section A: short answer questions and one essay question on the compulsory set work/area of study (50% weighting of Component 2).
    • Section B: two essay questions on the second set work/area of study (50% weighting of Component 2).

    Beyond A-level
    Our Dance students have been able to further their dance education at a variety of institutions, including vocational dance conservatoires such as London Contemporary Dance School, Northern School of Contemporary Dance, Rambert and Trinity Laban. Dancers may also choose to specialise in areas such as Dance Science, Dance History, Dance Performance, Dance Choreography and Dance in Education, as well as other Performing Arts professions, such as Physical Theatre, Musical Theatre and Drama.

    Even if a career in Dance isn’t your end goal, there are still many reasons why A-level Dance is the right course. A-level Dance fosters independent and proactive learning for life. It promotes the type of leadership skills that are needed in Higher Education and beyond. Students are well-versed in creative thinking and doing, enabling them to consider decisions and solve problems in a dynamic and comprehensive way. As well as written and verbal communication skills, students are adept at physically inferring and communicating ideas. Knowing how to effectively engage and relate to others, they make excellent collaborators and team players.
    Ultimately, A-level Dance helps to promote the practical, creative, social and academic skills needed to thrive in today’s complex and fast-paced world.

    Entry Requirements
    Grade 5 in English Language or Literature. Students are not required to have studies Dance at GCSE.
    • Experience of performing/training outside of school is desirable, but not essential.
    • Applicants may be required to undergo a practical assessment prior to acceptance on the course if they have not studied Dance at GCSE.

  • Drama and Theatre Studies

    This qualification emphasises practical creativity alongside research and theoretical understanding. Students learn through experience, seeing theatre and making theatre for themselves. Students are introduced to a wide range of theatrical styles and contexts as they explore plays practically, devise and work on performances.

    Each exam paper is designed to allow students to demonstrate their creativity and imagination in interpreting set texts and apply independent thinking as they evaluate a live theatre production.

    Course structure:
    Exam Board: AQA

    Component 1: Drama and theatre
    • Knowledge and understanding of drama and theatre
    • Study of two set plays
    • Analysis and evaluation of the work of live theatre maker
    How it’s assessed: Written exam: 3 hours, Open book, 80 marks, 40% of A-level.

    Component 2: Creating original drama (practical)
    • Process of creating devised drama
    • Performance of devised drama
    How it’s assessed: Working notebook (40 marks), Devised performance (20 marks), 30% of A-level.

    Component 3: Making theatre (practical) Practical exploration and interpretation of three extracts.
    How it’s assessed: Performance of Extract 3 (40 marks), Reflective report (20 marks), 30% of A-level.

    Beyond A-level
    Students of Drama and Theatre develop skills that are not just essential for drama but applicable to a wide range of higher education subjects and in the workplace.

    This specification refines students’ collaborative skills, their analytical thinking and their approach to research. Students grow in confidence and maturity as they successfully realise their own ideas. They learn to evaluate objectively and develop a sound appreciation of the influences that cultural and social contexts can have on decision making.

    Whatever the future holds, students of A-level Drama and Theatre emerge with a toolkit of transferable skills preparing them for their next steps.

    Entry Requirements:
    • Grade 5 English Language or Literature.
    • Students are not required to have studied drama at GCSE.
    • Experience of performing outside of school is desirable, but not essential.

  • Economics

    More than ever, it is a fascinating time to study Economics. Many aspects of everyday life involve economic problems and studying this subject will give you the tools to understand world events and the problems our society faces: poverty in the UK and elsewhere; the economic impact of the Ukranian war; the consequences of monopoly power amongst the giant tech firms, such as Apple; the long-term impact of financial crises.

    Economics is an academically rigorous subject in which you will learn to apply analytical models to real-world phenomena. You will develop the ability to think clearly and logically and have a considered opinion on national, European and world economic issues.

    The most important requisites for success are that you have an enquiring mind, an eye for detail and an eagerness to understand the world around you.

    If you are interested in understanding more about the implications for the UK of the rapid growth of economies such as China and, more recently, their slow-down; the economic justification for top footballers earning many multiples more than the Prime Minister, how climate change and plastic pollution threaten future economic growth and how economies can respond to the sudden economic changes precipitated by the global pandemic then this is likely to be the subject for you.

    As a social science, Economics combines well with both the humanities and sciences. It is very effective studied alongside Geography, History, Maths, Government & Politics and Philosophy and many students combine the subject with the sciences to develop breadth to their learning.

    Course Structure
    Exam Board: The course follows the AQA specification.

    Assessment is through three equally weighted exams at the end of the 2-year course. Each exam is 2 hours in duration and consists of a combination of short analytical questions and longer essays, drawing on your economic knowledge and unseen data provided in the exam.

    Beyond A-level:
    Studying the techniques, theorems and insights of Economics is not only seen as good preparation for a wide range of university courses (such as Business, Law, Geography, History, and Engineering); it is also in great demand by employers. Economics can prepare you for a number of different careers: business or banking; journalism or law; teaching or academia or as an economist for the government or a private firm. Regardless of your chosen future career, studying Economics will provide you with highly sought after skills, such as the ability to debate issues, handle and assimilate complex data and form reasoned opinions.

    Entry Requirements:
    Grade 6 in GCSE Maths and grade 5 in GCSE English Language.

  • English Language

    Studying language is about studying a fundamental aspect of what makes us human: communication. There are three main areas of study in the English Language course. Language Acquisition is the study of how children learn to speak from birth and in this part of the course you will use seminar teaching, research and real-life observations as part of your investigation. This may lead to further study in Linguistics, Speech Therapy, Teaching and Child Development. Crafting Language focuses on a genre study followed by the opportunity to produce your own written texts in your choice of genre for a range of audiences. Many students find this element of the course hugely rewarding and a useful preparation for further studies or employment in creative writing, journalism and advertising.

    Language is vital in shaping the world and our understanding of it: in the third component of this course students can choose their own area of special interest to investigate. Possible areas of focus include Global English, Language and Gender Identity, Language and Journalism, Language and Power or Regional Language Variation.

    Course Structure
    We follow the Pearson Edexcel specification
    .
    There is a combination of exam and coursework assessment. 3 exams weighted at 35%, 20% and 25% of the overall grade. Candidates apply linguistic knowledge and skills to a range of unseen and studied texts.

    1 assignment of 2,500 – 3,000 words, including candidate’s own original writing and analytical commentary weighted at 20% of the overall grade.

    Beyond A-level:
    Students who have studied Language at A-level have gone on to study and have careers in Law, Philosophy, English, Education, Politics, Creative Writing, Advertising and Marketing, Television and Radio, Copy Editing and Content Production, Journalism and many more.
    The course empowers students with transferable skills for life and work including
    written and verbal communication, interpretation, debate, evaluation, reading for inference & analysis, organisation, persuasion, team-work, independent learning and research.

    Entry Requirements:
    Grade 6 at GCSE for either English Language or Literature.

  • English Literature

    When we study Literature, we are studying an art form. It is more than reading wonderful books although that does form a large part of what you will be doing on a Literature course. Literature students read and discuss set novels, plays and poetry including Anthony and Cleopatra, The Picture of Dorian Gray, The Little Stranger, The Bloody Chamber and a range of ‘classic’ and contemporary poetry from exciting poets of diverse backgrounds.

    An A-level in Literature will introduce you to a wide range of challenging texts. It will showcase some of the greatest minds at work, inspiring you philosophically, as well as linguistically. In Literature, your writing skills will be honed and developed to an impressive level of powerfully expressed clarity.

    Classes are seminar style with plenty of opportunities to discuss ideas, themes, narrative and character. Literature students will also be encouraged to read widely with Reading Lists to support the set texts and to work independently in a way that will prepare them for degree-level studies.

    The English Department supports the teaching of this course with theatre trips and a day out at the EMC’s annual Literature Conference.

    Course structure:
    We follow the Pearson Edexcel specification
    .

    There is a combination of exam and coursework assessment.
    3 exams weighted at 30%, 30% and 20% of the overall grade. Candidates respond to questions and ‘unseen’ extracts on the set texts.
    1 assignment of 2,500 – 3,000 words, starting with the candidate’s own choice of focus, comparing The Bloody Chamber and a second text weighted at 20% of the overall grade.

    Beyond A-level:
    Students who have studied Literature at A-level have gone on to study and have careers in Law, Philosophy, English, Education, Politics, Creative Writing, Advertising and Marketing, Copy Editing and Content Production, Journalism, Television and Radio, Publishing and many more.

    The course empowers students with transferable skills for life and work including written and verbal communication, interpretation, debate, evaluation, reading for inference & analysis, organisation, persuasion, team-work, independent learning and research.

    Entry Requirements:
    Grade 6 at GCSE in English Literature or English Language.

  • Food Science and Nutrition

    (Level 3 Diploma Applied Food Science and Nutrition)

    This course has been designed to offer exciting, interesting experiences that focus learning through the acquisition of knowledge and understanding in purposeful, work-related contexts; linked to the food production industry. There will be a considerable amount of practical work consisting of cooking a wide range of skilful dishes and carrying out food-based experiments.

    This is currently the only food centred qualification available to study for post-16 learners and has been designed to replace the A-levels once offered in Food Technology and Home Economics. This is an Applied General qualification. This means it is designed primarily to support students who wish to progress to university.

    Course structure:

    Exam board: WJEC.
    The Level 3 Diploma is assessed using a combination of internal and external assessment.
    There are 4 units: 1 and 2 are compulsory and a third is chosen from units 3 or 4.
    Unit 1: Meeting Nutritional Needs of Specific Groups (compulsory) Internally and externally assessed.
    External assessment: 90 minute examination (90 marks)
    Internal assessment: an assignment will be set by the exam board, which will include written and practical work, carried out in controlled conditions.
    Unit 2: Ensuring Food is Safe to Eat (compulsory)
    Externally assessed. External assessment: 8 hour timed, supervised assessment responding to information provided in a scenario relating to a food safety situation.
    The following units are internally assessed:
    Unit 3: Experimenting to Solve Food Production Problems (optional)
    Unit 4: Current issues in Food Science and Nutrition (optional)
    The weighting of marks is 50% internal assessment (coursework) and 50% external examination.

    Beyond A-level:
    Together with other relevant qualifications at this level, students will be qualified to gain entry to higher education courses such as:
    • BSc Food and Nutrition or Human Nutrition or Public Health Nutrition
    • BSc (Hons) Food Science and Technology
    • BSc (Hons) Dietetics
    • BSc (Hons) / FdSc Food Development and Innovation
    • BA/BSc (Hons) Hospitality and Catering
    This diploma will also link extremely well with higher education courses in Sport and Exercise Science, Geography, Biomedical Science, Osteopathy, Social Sciences and even Art.

    Entry Requirements:
    A GCSE in Food Preparation and Nutrition is required at grade 6 or above

  • French

    Are you passionate about France and all things French? Are you independent and proactive in your approach to language learning? This course would suit you if you enjoy setting yourself language goals and targets, and working towards them.

    In our tutorial style classes, you will learn about the culture, history and politics of the Francophone world and soon become an expert in these areas. You will have individual attention to help you to grow as a linguist.

    In addition to your taught classes, we offer an hour per student per week with our French Assistant who will tailor the lessons to suit the needs of the individual. You will enhance your communication skills and develop the confidence to initiate face to face interactions and respond naturally and spontaneously.

    Nothing could equip you better for a changing world than learning a Modern Foreign Language at this level.

    Course structure:
    Exam Board: AQA

    Paper 1: Listening, Reading and Writing What’s assessed
    • Aspects of French-speaking society: current trends
    • Aspects of French-speaking society: current issues
    • Artistic culture in the French-speaking world
    • Aspects of political life in the French-speaking world
    • Grammar
    How it’s assessed
    • Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes, 50% of A-level
    Paper 2: Writing What’s assessed
    • One text and one film or two texts from the list set in the specification
    • Grammar
    How it’s assessed
    Written exam: 2 hours, 20% of A-level
    Paper 3: Speaking
    What’s assessed
    Individual research project
    One of four themes (Aspects of French-speaking society: current trends, Aspects of French-speaking society: current issues, Artistic culture in the French-speaking world, Aspects of political life in the French-speaking world)
    How it’s assessed
    • Oral exam: 21-23 minutes, 30% of A-level

    Beyond A-level:
    With an A-level in French you will have acquired not only practical language skills but also the skills of communication, analysis and argument which will be highly beneficial in any career you pursue.
    Graduates often go on to careers in the Foreign Office, international businesses, charities and NGOS to name but a few careers. It is also integral to, or complements, a huge number of careers including computing, travel and tourism, public administration, law, banking, medicine, journalism, education and social work.

    Entry Requirements:
    Grade 6 in GCSE French.

  • Geography

    Geography is “the subject which holds the key to our future”. With what is occurring in the world, there has never been a more vital time to study Geography – learning about climate change, migration, environmental degradation, social issues and natural hazards has never been more relevant. The Guardian, in 2015, identified Geography as the ‘must have A-level’ and, with the world changing more now than ever, 4 years on this remains true. Geography bridges the gap between the social and the physical, broadening your ability to understand the world around you. The course splits its topics into human and physical, however geography is incredibly fluid and issues often overlap.

    The skills developed in A-level Geography will benefit you exponentially. Throughout the A-level course we focus on becoming independent thinkers and learners, whilst also having the skills to understand and critique a range of views and opinions. The A-level also offers the opportunity to develop investigative skills and data analysis through fieldwork study visits.

    Course structure:
    Exam Board: Edexcel

    This A-level is examined by three written examination papers (80%) and one piece of coursework (20%).

    Paper 1 is 2 hours 15 minutes and 30% of the total marks It includes
    Section A: Tectonic Processes and Hazards
    Section B: Landscape Systems, Processes and Change (with sub-topic Coastal Landscapes and Change)
    Section C: The Water Cycle and Water Insecurity and The Carbon Cycle and Energy Security.
    Paper 2 is 2 hours 15 minutes and is 30% of the total marks It includes:
    Section A: Globalisation and Superpowers
    Section B: Shaping Places
    Section C: Global Development and Connections
    Paper 3 is 2 hours and 15 minutes which is 20% of qualification. It examines the following three themes: Players, Attitudes and Actions. Coursework is 20%: You define a question or issue for investigation, relating to the A-level content. Your investigation will incorporate fieldwork data and your own research and/or secondary data.

    Beyond A-level:
    Geography is a broad based subject which provides a huge number of opportunities for future progression. Geography is a clear choice for careers involving sustainability, urban regeneration, energy supply, managing natural hazards and climate change. However, it is a great option if you are thinking about a career in human rights, international relations or development; for example, learning how development is measured or the impact of migration on societies.
    However, if you have no clear career path or university degree programme you might want to follow, geography is excellent for developing transferable skills; whilst demonstrating academic ability.

    Entry Requirements:
    Grade 6 in GCSE Geography.

  • Government & Politics

    Government & Politics is an exciting and challenging course which tackles some of the biggest questions about the way in which our country is run, as well as focusing on the difference between US and UK Politics. If you’re interested in current affairs and want to learn more about the people who lead our country, this is the course for you.

    Course structure:
    Exam Board: AQA Advanced level course.

    Assessment is 100% exam based.
    During the first year of the course you will look at Elections, Political Parties, Pressure Groups, Parliament, the Prime Minister and Government. The topics are examined both in terms of the powers of the institutions and how individuals have used these powers to try and achieve their aims.

    In the second year you will look more closely at US Politics. Topics studied are: Reforming the electoral system; Use of referendums; Why electors vote for the parties that they do; Why so many people do not vote in elections; The use of Direct Action by pressure groups and where does power lie in the US and UK systems of government.

    Beyond A-level:
    The subject can be studied in combination with a range of others but English, History and Social Sciences are the most common combination. The main requirements are an interest in Politics and the ability to express yourself well on paper.

    The vast majority of our Government & Politics students’ progress onto university and many take related degrees: Government, International Relations or Public Administration. This subject is particularly useful if you are looking for a career in Law, Civil Service, Local Government or the Police. Government & Politics students have secured excellent work experience placements with local MPs.

    Any potential employer who sees that an applicant has studied Government & Politics will realise that this is someone who takes an interest in the world at large and is likely to be a valuable asset to any team. The nature of this course and the activities undertaken within it will hone your communication skills, creativity, independence of thought, your respect for the views of others and problem-solving skills.

    Entry Requirements:
    Grade 6 in English Language or Literature.

  • History

    History offers the committed student a tremendous opportunity – you can study some of the most exciting, controversial and important stories of the past and do so in an academically respectable way.

    The course ranges over the sixteenth and twentieth centuries, and includes some of the social, political and intellectual topics that have shaped the way we live and think today. Lots of subjects deal with big issues and big personalities, but History is different; in History the big issues really happened and the big personalities really existed. You can have fun, and develop an exceptional range of transferable skills. We love history – let us show you why!

    Course structure:
    Exam board: AQA

    Module 1 (40%) – The Tudors: England 1485-1603 The whole sweep of the Tudor family, from Henry VII’s seizure of the throne through to his granddaughters Bloody Mary and Gloriana.
    Module 2 (40%) – The American Dream: reality and illusion, 1945-1980 The way the USA rose to dominate the world in the years after World War Two, and the way presidents like Kennedy and Nixon dealt with the challenges they faced.
    NEA (non-examined assessment) (20%) – an extended essay on a topic of your own choosing.

    Beyond A-level:
    History teaches a broad range of transferable skills which equip you to do just about anything at degree level and beyond. You will learn to assess material critically and then turn it into a clear, organised and convincing argument – exactly the kind of skills that careers like law, journalism and public relations call for. However, you don’t have to be limited to that – history will demonstrate an understanding of and empathy for the human condition, leading into careers in medicine, NGOs, the civil service and charitable sectors.

    Entry Requirements:
    Grade 6 in GCSE History. Alternatively, a grade 6 in English Language or Literature will be considered if students have not studied History at GCSE.

  • Latin

    Latin A-level develops precise, analytical thinking. If you are logical, have an attention to detail and enjoy language then it is a subject for you. The language element of the course develops problem solving skills as we translate prose and verse passages, exploring how the grammar and syntax has been used by an author.

    The literature element of the course focuses on developing your empathetic and evaluative skills. We study ancient rhetoric and oratory reading Cicero’s murder trial, Murder at Larinum as well as historiography with Tacitus Annals Book IV, exploring the reign of the emperor Tiberius. For verse literature, we study the passionate love poems of Catullus as he grapples with his feelings for his mistress, as well as the climactic ending of Virgil’s Aeneid in the final duel between Aeneas and Turnus in Book XII.

    Latin A-level is a challenging but rewarding course which combines well with both Arts and Science courses. Studying Latin, A-level gives you the key to Romance languages, provides an experience of literature and mythology that resonates through English Literature and gives you an understanding of the language of legal, diplomatic and religious communication.

    Course structure:
    Exam Board: OCR- H443

    Unseen Translation: 33% of total A-level
    Prose Comprehension: 17% of total A-level
    Prose Literature: 25% of total A-level
    Verse Literature: 25% of total A-level

    Beyond A-level:
    Latin is a rigorous and demanding A-level which develops your logic and problem solving skills. As such, it is highly regarded by universities and employers and sits equally well with both Science and Arts courses. Latin leads to a range of careers including Law and Finance.

    Entry Requirements:
    Grade 7 in GCSE Latin.

  • Law

    Law plays a vital and wide-ranging role in society. Its functions include protecting the public, regulating relationships, the construction of agreements and the resolution of disputes. A level Law is a thinking, writing, debating, and learning subject. You need to be able to understand precision use of language, and to write clearly, and you will learn how to argue, on paper and in class, to develop and defend your views on how legal principles apply to specific situations. And yes, you do need a reasonable memory for the names and events involved in key cases.

    An aspect of A level Law students particularly enjoy is the ‘case study’ approach, in which legal principles are applied to real-life cases. For example, Fagan v Metropolitan Police Commissioner (1969), where a police officer’s foot was accidentally driven over and parked upon, or the negligence case of Donoghue v Stevenson (1932) involving the infamous snail in the ginger beer. It is the combination of human stories raising real and relevant issues that makes A level Law an engaging, yet challenging subject to study.

    Course structure
    • Nature of Law: This examines the relationship of law with society, morality and justice, and explores fundamental concepts such as the ‘Rule of Law’ and ‘Parliamentary Sovereignty’.
    • English Legal System: This unit covers how law is made both centrally within parliament, and by decisions made in the appeal courts. You learn about key legal institutions, including the civil and criminal court hierarchy, and the various processes and personnel involved in the practice of law.
    • Criminal Law: This considers both Fatal (Murder, Voluntary and Involuntary manslaughter) and Non-Fatal Offences Against the Person (Assault, Battery, Actual Bodily Harm, Grievous Bodily Harm) as well, as offences against property. Criminal legal theory is also studied to provide context.
    • Tort Law: This explores various torts (‘wrongs’) including Negligence and Private Nuisance and explores concepts such as ‘Liability’ and deals with the ‘Remedies’ available to the courts.
    • Option choice: You study either Human Rights or Contract Law. Human Rights considers the historical development of human rights and the legal theory underlying the current approach. Contract Law deals with the essential components of contract; offer, acceptance, consideration, and intention to create legal relations.

    Beyond A level

    As well as being innately interesting, A level Law provides a taster for Law at university (though it is not required) and gives students a head start compared to those who have never studied Law before. Research carried out by AQA shows that university Law faculties welcome applications from students who have taken A level Law, provided that their A level subject combination meets ‘breadth’ and ‘skills’ requirements .
    A level Law is also useful for those with no intention of reading Law at university. It is stimulating, promotes critical thinking, and deals with current issues such as ‘right to die’, or the legal significance of Brexit. It encompasses skills and knowledge that are relevant and prized in many vocational areas.

    Entry requirements
    Grade 6 in GCSE English Language or Literature

  • Mathematics

    The study of Mathematics in the Sixth Form offers an opportunity to extend your knowledge of topics from GCSE such as algebra and trigonometry, but also to encounter entirely new branches of Mathematics. You will push the boundaries of your understanding quite literally to infinity, with the study of calculus, infinite sequences, connected systems in mechanics and statistical distributions. To gain the most from this course you should be an enthusiastic problem solver with an inquiring mind and an eye for detail, and you should have a very good grasp of algebra at GCSE.

    Extra-curricular opportunities include participation in the UKMT individual and team Mathematics Challenges, and in the Mathematical Association local branch activities.

    Extension classes are available for any student applying to Oxbridge, Warwick or Imperial for Mathematics-related courses; and who therefore require additional support with preparation for additional entrance tests or interviews.

    Course structure:
    Exam Board: OCR Mathematics A (H240)

    Paper 1 – Pure (33⅓% – 100 marks)
    Paper 2 – Pure & Statistics (33⅓% – 100 marks)
    Paper 3 – Pure & Mechanics (33⅓% – 100 marks)
    There is also a pre-release data set that is to be used in Paper 2.

    Beyond A-level:
    Mathematics combines well with any other subjects and is highly regarded by universities and employers. Many students go on to study pure mathematics, engineering, medicine, economics/finance and computer science.

    The financial sector, the actuarial profession, ICT, teaching and academia are some of the most popular choices but there is a huge choice of careers available. Most areas of business and industry rely on people with good mathematical knowledge, analytical, investigative and problem-solving skills and A-level Mathematics fully supports students in developing these skills.

    Entry Requirements:
    Grade 7 in GCSE Maths

  • Further Mathematics

    Further Mathematics is ideal for those students who love the subject of Mathematics! You will be devoting two whole A-level subjects to Mathematics and Further Mathematics so you must be a keen problem solver with excellent algebra skills. You will begin to understand new aspects of mathematics in complex numbers which previously you thought as impossible, essential statistical techniques, optimisation problems and the mathematics behind mechanics in the real world.

    Extra-curricular opportunities include participation in the UKMT individual and team Mathematics Challenges, and in the Mathematical Association’s local branch activities.

    Extension classes are available for any student applying to Oxbridge, Warwick or Imperial for Mathematics-related courses; and who therefore require additional support with preparation for additional entrance tests or interviews.

    Course structure:
    Exam Board – OCR Mathematics A (H245)

    Paper 1 – Core Pure 1 (25% – 75 marks)
    Paper 2 – Core Pure 2 (25% – 75 marks)
    Paper 3 & 4: two of: Statistics (25% – 75 marks)
    Mechanics (25% – 75 marks)
    Discrete (25% – 75 marks)
    Additional Pure (25% – 75 marks)

    In addition to the Mathematics lessons, Further Mathematics will be taught in a separate class. The study of Mathematics and Further Mathematics in Year 12 only, as a means of achieving A-level Mathematics in a year, is not an option.

    Beyond A-level:
    Further Mathematics combines well with any other subjects, especially Physics and is highly regarded by universities and employers. Many students go on to study pure mathematics, engineering and computer science.

    The engineering, computer science and finance sectors are the most popular choices and they require an analytical, investigative and problem solving mind. An A-level Further Mathematics student will acquire all of these necessary skills by the end of the course.

    Entry Requirements:
    Grade 8 in GCSE Maths.

  • Music

    Students who have a love of listening to and performing music will find studying Music A-level extremely rewarding. We study a huge range of music from Bach to Kate Bush and from The Beatles to the Batman soundtrack. There is music to suit every taste and openminded students will find many musical discoveries along the way.

    As well as developing analytical and listening skills, students are able to develop their skills as a performer. Instrumentalists and vocalists are given many performance opportunities during the course which culminates in a showcase of their performing talent during a final recital.

    Independence is a prominent feature of the course and students enjoy tailoring their composition projects to match their own musical interests and talents while working in a variety of genres.

    This independence to develop as a creative musician alongside opening students’ ears to such a wide range of music provides a great opportunity for students to develop into accomplished and mature musicians.

    Course structure:
    Exam Board: Edexcel

    30% Performance: an eight minute recital on your strongest instrument
    30% Composition: one 4 minute composition (either free or written to a brief)
    one compositional techniques exercise
    40% Listening and Appraising exam (2hrs) covering 6 areas of study: Vocal Music, Instrumental Music, Music for Film, Popular Music and Jazz, Fusions and New Directions.

    Beyond A-level:
    Music A-level prepares students to go on to study Music at University or Music College/Conservatoire. The course also prepares students for possible Choral/Instrumental Scholarships at University (which can often be pursued even when not studying for a degree in Music). Music is also an excellent preparation for an extremely wide range of degree courses as it contains analytical and essay writing skills, alongside more scientific and mathematical approaches.

    Career opportunities in Music include (but are not limited to) – performance, composition (including for Film and TV), arts administration (such as artist management), radio/recording producer, music therapy and music education. Amongst the many transferable skills in the subject perhaps the strongest are; self-discipline and independence, creative thinking and ability to collaborate effectively.

    Entry Requirements:
    Grade 6 in GCSE Music or Grade 5 Music Theory.

  • Philosophy, Religion & Ethics

    You will find every lesson inspirational and life changing. Why? Because Philosophy is an excellent training in thinking for yourself. The questions you investigate are the most profound questions you can ask. If there are any answers to these questions, they are not obvious! This means you have to be open minded. This doesn’t just mean it gives you new thoughts, but that it opens up new ways of thinking – about yourself, about others, about the world.

    Doing Philosophy is not easy; it is tricky to understand the arguments and the ideas. However, with doing anything that is tricky, you develop new skills that make you highly employable.

    Some of the skills that doing Philosophy can teach you are:
    a) understanding the relations between ideas: how one idea can imply another or contradict it
    b) the ability to spot flaws in arguments
    c) the ability to argue
    d) imagination: coming up with novel solutions and novel ideas
    e) communication and conversation: philosophy is done through discussion and debate.
    Most importantly you develop self-understanding: taking all these ideas together – being able to think independently, reflect on deep questions but without resorting to what you already think. Even more, Philosophy can help you understand yourself. It is what education is really about. What more could you want from an A-level?

    Course structure:
    Exam Board: OCR (H573)

    This A-level is examined by three written examination papers. Each Paper is 2 hours long and counts for a third of your total marks. In each paper you write 3 essays form a choice of 4 Paper 1 Philosophy
    Paper 2 Ethics
    Paper 3 Modern Developments of Thought
    In Paper 1 examples of what you study are: ancient philosophical influences, the nature of the soul, mind and body, the problem of evil, the nature of language.
    In Paper 2 examples of what you study are: divergent ideas of right and wrong, utilitarianism, Kantian ethics, situation ethics and natural law. The conscience. Sexual ethics and the influence on ethical thought of developments in religious beliefs.
    In Paper 3 examples of what you study are: feminism, Marxism and secularism.

    Beyond A-level:
    It’s surprising just how many career paths a Philosophy, Religion and Ethics A-level or degree can help you with. In a nutshell, doing philosophy can make a significant contribution to any job that requires you to think well, that is clearly and rigorously.
    Big business – the City firms, the banks, the management consultancies, the chartered accountants – are enthusiastic about people who’ve done philosophy A-level or degree, because they know how to think clearly.
    Philosophy students also go into law, politics, and the civil service. Journalism is a logical career path, since you have to be able to write well and present ideas logically and clearly. Advertising is another choice, and of course, last in this very incomplete list, but never least, there’s always education! So, a degree in Philosophy opens doors, it doesn’t close them.

    Entry Requirements:
    Grade 6 in English Language or Literature.

  • Photography

    “Photography takes an instant out of time, altering life by holding it still.” – Dorothea Lange

     

    We are surrounded by photography. Sharing imagery is a global form of communication and students who choose Photography are choosing an exciting and relevant subject for the workplace of today and of the future!

    During the A-level you will consider the importance of certain images and discuss the context of photographs throughout history. In the first term you will learn how to take professional quality photographs using both digital and film cameras. You will learn how to control the camera to shoot any subject in any light conditions. You will learn how to edit using the darkroom and the Adobe digital suite, including Photoshop. You will engage with a variety of artists and photographers work learning to analyse and make connections with your work. From this you will be encouraged to experiment and ‘break the rules’ to produce personal, original and meaningful visual pieces which will form a final year exhibition.

    Photography complements many other subjects across the curriculum including the sciences, maths and humanities subjects, as well as those who wish to study the visually creative subjects such as Art or Media alongside. You may decide to take your work into a variety of areas such as fashion, journalism, documentary, advertising or fine art. Your portfolio can be used to apply for a foundation course in any arts subject or directly to a degree course of your choice.

    Course structure:
    Exam board: OCR

    Coursework 60% Exam 40%
    Assessment is based on the sketchbook, portfolio and outcomes produced throughout the 2 year course alongside the final exam which is done internally and structured with support in the weeks leading up to the timed test. The timed test is 15hrs unaided work on a final outcome.

    Beyond A-level:
    Photography A-level can lead to a variety of degree courses depending on the subjects chosen alongside it: Photography, Film, Art, Drama/Theatre, Computer science, Curating, Media related degrees, Marketing and business, Forensics, Architecture.

    Linked career choices:
    Commercial Art Gallery Manager, Curating, Brand Ambassador/Sales Promotion Executives, Multimedia Specialist, Community Arts Worker, Advertising Art Director, Marketing Assistant, Web Editor, Forensics, Television/radio/broadcasting, Magazine editor, Graphic designer, Press Photographer, Journalist, Stylist, Web designer, Visual merchandiser, VFX artist.

    Entry Requirements:
    Students do not have to have taken GCSE art or photography. It would be advantageous for students to have achieved at least a level 6/7 in English at GCSE.

  • Physics

    Physics is the most fundamental science because it answers the really big questions – ‘Do you want to understand how everything works, from your phone to the universe?’

    Physics lies behind all technologies from cancer treatment and the internet, to sportswear and climate change. Under the traditional topic headings below, the excitement begins when the power of the underlying equations enables you to solve problems and link together different areas. There are lots of practical exploration lessons in our very well-equipped labs which bring the equations to life! The application of ideas demonstrate how Physics is central to all intellectual endeavour and everyday life.

    We start in Year 12 with the very small: the mysteries of Quantum Physics, studying photons and quarks. We finish with the very large: the supernovas and galaxy clusters in the Cosmology option. This course will vastly expand your knowledge and will develop in you an analytical and inquiring approach to your physical and intellectual environment; which will prepare you for everything that lies ahead!

    Course structure:
    Exam board: AQA
    Assessment: 100% exam – three two-hour papers, with practical endorsement based on lab work. Units:
    1 Measurements and their errors
    2 Particles and radiation
    3 Waves
    4 Mechanics and materials
    5 Electricity
    6 Further mechanics and thermal physics
    7 Fields and their consequences
    8 Nuclear physics
    9 Astrophysics

    Beyond A-level:

    Physics leads to further study and careers in physics, all sciences, engineering and computing. In addition, the very strong analytical skills that physicists develop, make them very attractive to a very wide range of employers including the financial sector. This highly regarded ‘A’ level leads to a very wide range of opportunities.

    Entry Requirements:
    Grade 7 in GCSE Maths and grade 7 in GCSE Physics or Double Science.

  • Physical Education (PE)

    A-level PE is an academically challenging and diverse course studying the physical, psychological and cultural aspects of sporting performance. Students will gain a fantastic insight into the amazing world of sports performance and deepen their knowledge of the how and why of physical activity. When delving into the interlinked factors that can impact on performance, students will gain an understanding of why an athlete can compete outstandingly one week; and sub-standard the next and how minor adjustments to technique or diet can have a ‘winning’ impact.

    Due to the combination of physical and theoretical performance, students will have the opportunity to apply all newly acquired knowledge to their own practical performance in their chosen sport.

    Course structure:
    Exam Board: OC

    30% non-exam assessment consisting of one practical performance in a sport of the student’s choice, and one piece of course work allowing for application of theory to sporting performance.
    70% theoretical study covering applied anatomy and physiology, skill acquisition, sport and society, biomechanical movement, sports psychology, and contemporary issues. These are assessed through 3 written papers:
    Paper 1 – Physiological factors affecting performance (30% weighting)
    Paper 2 – Psychological factors affecting performance (20% weighting)
    Paper 3 – Socio-cultural issues in physical activity and sport (20% weighting)

    Beyond A-level:

    A-level PE combines well with subjects such as Biology, Economics, Geography and Psychology. It is a recognised entry qualification to Higher Education and is of particular value to those wishing to pursue careers in sport science, sports coaching and development, sports therapy, teaching, leisure management or the Armed Forces. It is also valuable for medically-related courses such as nursing, sports rehabilitation and physiotherapy.

    However, it isn’t only about further education. Students will leave as confident leaders and life-long learners. They will have developed independent, critical thinking skills and will have been required to use their initiative and resourcefulness often when under pressure.

    Entry Requirements:
    Grade 5 in GCSE PE Club level standard practical performance within one sporting activity.

  • Psychology

    Ever wondered if prison really does change criminal behaviour? Or why some people confirm? Or perhaps if the experiences you had before the age of five really do shape the person you are today?

    Psychology is the science of the mind. The human mind is the most complex machine on Earth. It is the source of all thought and behaviour. Psychologists use human behaviour as a clue to the workings of the mind. Although we cannot observe the mind directly, everything we do, think, feel and say is determined by the functioning of the mind – so psychologists take human behaviour as the raw data for testing their theories about how the mind works.

    This A-level is designed to develop skills of analysis and evaluation through an examination of arguments and evidence put forward by psychologists. You will develop your problem solving and communication skills. The ideal student would enjoy discussion, reading about new ideas and challenging assumptions. Good numeracy skills are required due to the scientific/mathematical nature of the subject.

    Course structure:
    Exam board: AQA (A)

    What topics you will study?
    Year 1
    Social Influence, Memory, Attachment, Approaches in psychology, Biopsychology, Psychopathology, Research Methods
    Year 2
    Compulsory content – Issues and debates in psychology Optional Content Relationships, Gender or Cognition and Development, Schizophrenia, Eating Behaviour or Stress, Aggressions, Forensic Psychology or Addiction
    How is it assessed:
    There are three exams, each account for one third of your A-level. The three exams last 2 hours and are worth 96 marks each. Each exam consists of multiple choice, short answer and extended writing questions.

    Beyond A-level:
    Students who have taken A-level in Psychology often go on to degree courses in:
    Psychology, English studies, Sociology, Business Studies, Teaching, Sport and exercise science, Law.
    Studying psychology at university can give you a whole host of exciting career options, including: Marketing, Business Development, Accountancy, Human Resources, Forensic psychology, Occupational Therapy, Clinical psychology, Nursing, Teaching.

    Entry Requirements:
    Grade 6 in Maths and grade 6 in English Language or Literature at GCSE.

  • Sociology

    Sociology is an immensely challenging and exciting discipline. Its aim is to understand how societies work. It investigates the structures and cultures of different societies throughout the world and throughout history. When you study sociology, you will acquire the knowledge and skills to analyse society in the United Kingdom in the 21st Century.

    You will also gain an understanding of the theories and concepts which form a key part of the current debate about contemporary society and the critical changes taking place. Sociology will certainly help you to help make sense of your own experiences in society. It can give you new ways of seeing the social world around you. You will also develop the necessary skills to enable you to assess different views and reach conclusions about society based upon a careful consideration of evidence.

    Course structure:

    In Year 12, you will study: Education with Methods in Context: Do children from different social and ethnic backgrounds have an equal and fair chance at school? Why do girls do better than boys in exams; How do Sociologists research society and in particular the education system?

    Topics in Sociology (Families and households): Why do we live in families? Are women and men equal in families? How much power and influence do children have in their families?

    In Year 13, you will study: Topics in Sociology (Beliefs in Society): Why do young people have an increasingly low level of participation in religion? What are sects and cults? Is there an increase in fundamentalism and why?

    Crime and Deviance with Theory and Methods: What is crime? How is it different from deviance? Who breaks the law and why? Is the criminal justice system racist? What are sociological perspectives? How do sociologists research society and human behaviour?

    Beyond A-level:
    A Level Sociology provides a good preparation for University as it equips you with the skills needed to succeed in higher education. It is also important for any career which involves dealing with the general public such as teaching, social work, police and youth work. Moreover, it is particularly relevant for those working in market research and social science research. Finally, it can lead to careers in advertising, journalism, government policy making, business and law.

    Entry Requirements:
    Grade 6 in GCSE English Language or Literature

  • Spanish

    Are you passionate Spain and all things Spanish? Are you independent and proactive in your approach to language learning? This course would suit you if you enjoy setting yourself language goals and working towards them.

    In our tutorial style classes, you will learn about the culture, history and politics of the Hispanic world and soon become an expert in these areas. You will have individual attention to help you to grow as a linguist. In addition to your taught classes, we offer an hour per student per week with our Spanish Assistant who will tailor the lessons to suit the needs of the individual. You will enhance your communication skills and develop the confidence to initiate face to face interactions and respond naturally and spontaneously.

    Nothing could equip you better for a changing world than learning a Modern Foreign Language at this level.

    Course structure
    Exam board: AQA

    Paper 1: Listening, Reading and Writing
    • Aspects of Spanish-speaking society: current trends
    • Aspects of Spanish-speaking society: current issues
    • Artistic culture in the Spanish-speaking world
    • Aspects of political life in the Spanish-speaking world
    • Grammar
    How it’s assessed
    Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes, 50% of A-level

    Paper 2: Writing
    • One text and one film or two texts from the list set in the specification
    • Grammar
    How it’s assessed
    Written exam: 2 hours, 20% of A-level

    Paper 3: Speaking
    Individual research project
    One of four themes (Aspects of Spanish-speaking society: current trends, Aspects of Spanish-speaking society: current issues, Artistic culture in the Spanish-speaking world, Aspects of political life in the Spanish-speaking world)
    How it’s assessed
    Oral exam – 21-23 minutes, 30% of A-level

    Beyond A-level:
    With an A-level in Spanish you will have acquired not only practical language skills, but also the skills of communication, analysis and argument which will be highly beneficial in any career you pursue. Graduates often go on to careers in the Foreign Office, international businesses, charities and NGOS to name but a few careers.
    It is also integral to, or complements, a huge number of careers including computing, travel and tourism, public administration, law, banking, medicine, journalism, education and social work.

    Entry Requirements:
    Grade 6 in GCSE Spanish.

A Levels

In Year 12 students typically take three A Level courses, with the option of 4 for those who are who are comfortable with the rigour that four subjects demand. We guarantee to build the timetable around the choices you make, not vice versa, so that many combinations of subjects are possible. Average A Level class size is 5, with tutorial-style teaching.

View our latest A Level results by subject here.

Wider Learning

The GDST LEAD (Leadership and Enterprise Advanced Diploma) programme, EdTech vision and BrightFutures all offer exciting additional opportunities.
Students can choose one of three enrichment options. This year, the options are either the GDST Space Technology Diploma, the DELE or DELF Language Diploma or Brighton Girls Culinary Arts Course.

EPQ

In addition, Year 12 students take part in an Extended Project Qualification (EPQ). The EPQ allows you to go beyond the A Level syllabus and prepare more fully for university or a future career. It’s a flexible way to enrich your studies, with a choice of areas to explore and investigate. It also effectively adds half an A-level to your qualifications as an A* grade adds 28 UCAS points.

Although this standalone qualification is studied independently, you are fully supported with 120 guided learning hours. 30 of these are study skills sessions that focus on identifying, planning, managing, researching and developing projects.

 

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